Sunday, December 16, 2007

Bugz in the Attic

JakJazz gave me chances to practice my photography skills, which progresses like snail pace, and also a good place to improve my outdated education level on jazz to at least recognize new names, faces and hopefully also their music. These were the reason why we decided to watch Bugz in the Attic special show on the first day of JakJazz Festival 2007.


Special show means that we should take out extra money of Rp.250,000 each from our wallet to enter the concert area of what they called the Super Premium Stage at about 11.30 p.m., Friday evening, November 23. We should leave Maliq & D'Essentials show at Big Stage 1 in order to attend the music lecture from Bugz in the Attic group.

JakJazz official website is one of the sources of my education about the group. The other sources are the group official website, WartaJazz website and some reviews as results of Googling activities.

The loose group was formed in 1997 in England, West London to be exact, by all-star broken beat crew of DJs and producers who frequently performed at famous clubs in England, such as Orin Walters (Afronaught), Paul Dolby (Seiji), Kaidi Tatham, Daz-I-Kue, Alex Phountzi (Neon Fusion), Cliff Scott, Mark Force, Matt Lord dan Mikey Stirton. Mike, however, left the group early this year.

Bugz in the Attic is one of the pioneers of a new genre in jazz that swept Europe in the last decade named crossover jazz or some refer it as nu jazz that combines jazz, electronic sounds, dance, and trance. Hence, the instruments they used at Senayan were only drums, percussion, keyboard and synthesizer.

The Senayan hall was only less than half occupied, possibly because of Friday and also not many people were willing to pay an extra money while there were Maliq, Syaharani, and other shows outside.

It was pretty cold in the hall, still not so many people moved their bodies with the music to warm them up. The singers and the group in fact tried their best to invite people to dance, but few Indonesians respond actively with their bodies to music, except to dang dut, or when they are in nite clubs.

Whilst we enjoyed the show and the new lessons we got, we didn't stay until the end of it, and thanks to the decision as we could see a few last songs of Syaharani's performance at the Big Stage 2 on the way to the parking lot. It's a happy ending of the day.